PRICING IS CONTINGENT  ON A LOT OF FACTORS.  CONDITION, RARITY, MARKET STRENGTH, REGIONAL LOCATION, UPGRADES, MONEY SPENT FIXING, GREED, RELUCTANCE TO SELL ETC ETC..

A ROUGH GUIDE, AND ONE THAT I THINK IS FAIR, COMES FROM ONE OF MY FAVORITE SCOOTER WEBSITES AND BLOGS:  SCOOTERLOUNGE

CLICK ON THESE LINKS TO RESEARCH A MODEL:


VESPA:
http://www.scooterlounge
.com/vespa/buyers-guide/index.shtml


LAMBRETTA:
http://www.scooterlounge
.com/lambretta/buyers-guide
/index.shtml



  Daddy's Girls / La Cocca di Papá
WHAT THE HECK IS GOING ON HERE ? . . .

THESE ARE "DADDY'S GIRLS" - MY PERSONAL HAREM OF SCOOTER HOTTIES: 
  • SOMETIMES FULLY RESTORED, SOMETIMES JUST RESCUED AND TWEAKED TO RUN, BUT ALWAYS POLISHED, RIDDEN AND LOVED.
  • ALL THE GOODIES:  MOTOR, MECHANICALS AND ELECTRICAL ARE WORKING, ROADWORTHY AND SAFE.
  • ALL HAVE CLEAN HASSLE-FREE TITLES.
IN OTHER WORDS, THESE LADIES ARE LOCKED, COCKED AND READY TO ROCK - BOOYAH DADDY, BOOYAH!
NOTE FROM YOUR MOTHER:
  • CYBER-PARKED HERE IS MY SELF-IMPOSED LIMIT OF NO MORE THAN 4 PERSONAL SCOOTS THAT YOUR'S TRULY DRIVES ON A DAILY BASIS.
ANOTHER NOTE FROM YOUR MOTHER:
  • MY THERAPIST HAS SUGGESTED THAT I PUT A PRICE ON EVERY SCOOTER I OWN - EVEN MY PERSONAL SCOOTS.
  • SHE REASONS THAT THIS WILL KEEP ME FROM BECOMING A HOARDER.
  •  I REASON A SECOND INCOME FROM BEING FEATURED ON THE TLC CHANNEL'S "HOARDING: BURIED ALIVE" IS A SOUND FISCAL PLAN - BUT WHAT DO I KNOW?

THIS TIME FROM YO MAMA:
  • IF YOU THINK THE LISTED PRICE FOR A "DADDY'S GIRL" IS TOO FAR UP THAT MODEL'S VALUE SPECTRUM, THEN IT'S SAFE TO ASSUME I'M NOT ANXIOUS TO PART WAYS WITH A FAVORITE MISTRESS! 
  • ALAS, NOTHING LASTS FOREVER.  EVEN A FAVORITE MISTRESS IS SOMETIMES READY FOR ANOTHER LOVER. 
  • MAKE ME A REASONABLE OFFER IF YOU'RE THE NEXT SUGAR DADDY!   (THERAPISTS SUGGESTION - NOT MINE)
1959 Vespa 150 VBA (roundtail) @ $4,500



Pretty in Pink! 

I love pastel colors - especially when it's classic pink combined with sharp retro black and white accents!  It screams late 50's early 60's - think of Elvis's pink Caddy mounted on a set of stylish Conti whitewalls - luxurious baby, luxurious.

There's probably not a more recognizable scooter silhouette in the world than our gal pictured above.  The Vespa 150 series, first sold in 1959, quickly became the epitome of form, function and fun! . . . Did I mention it was fun?

It introduced the covered headset (versus the bicycle-like handlebars prior) to the masses and quickly became an icon in film, music, magazines and popular culture the world over!

This one is a killer "resto-mod."  A resto-mod or "restoration-modification" is a particular type of restroation where you restore the exterior vintage-correct but modify various mechanical components for either dependability, power or modern convenience.

So what "upgrades" you ask? 

Instead of the original 3 speed 125 cc (slow as molasses) motor, this baby is sporting the very powerful, very dependable 4 speed electronic Rally 200 cc (keeps up with modern traffic) engine.  Very cool and totally unassuming mounted on her original 8" rims and old-school Conti whitewalls. 

As if that weren't enough,  the engine's been retro-fitted with a battery powered push-button electric-starter!
  While convenient, you can still use the old school kick-start (I do!) but a simple push of a button and you're off to work without breaking a sweat.  Nice if you're dressed up, in heels (yeah, you too guys - I don't judge) or just like pushing buttons!

Can you say "Sleeper Speedster" in a "Betty Boop" package?  Yes, then go get all up in that pink by clicking on her gallery link:

http://scooterpazzo.smugmug.com/Other/1959-Vespa-VBA-roundtail-200cc/38373290_Z2bVJC


This is a slick little restoration that I would love to take credit for . . . except somebody else beat me to it.

She was designed and built south of me by Moto Paradiso in swanky Santa Barbara - chez, chez pooh pooh!  They did a striking job with subtle touches like painting the horncast a "soft white" to tie-in the sexy whitewall tires - simply gorgeous.  

I also like the decision to keep original little things intact for authenticity and personality:  the brass steering column lock, the glovebox latch and the rare 6-window "clamshell" speedometer.  These Items are almost always replaced with new but give great subtle character when preserved.


Speaking of the speedo, it was rebuilt with a custom faceplate to tie into the theme by maestro Steve Burdette (shameless plug - he does great work) at Speedo King in SoCal - nice.

She was obviously commissioned for a private client because you don't go pink unless you've got a buyer.  Why you ask?  Because your audience of buyers is greatly narrowed when you don't play it safe!


Why the heck did I buy her then then you ask?  Quite simple . . . I love this scoot and I don't play it safe!
 
She spoke to me wearing that Marilyn Monroe pink evening gown draped around those voluptuous curves . . . Ooohhhh . . . I need to get a room!




MECHANICAL WORK:  Engine (Rally 200 motor) rebuild and replacement.  Battery powered electric start unit.  Full rebuild of electrical and mechanical systems.  All cables replaced.  Rebuild (Speedo King) of the original 6 window speedometer including a custom faceplate.

COSMETIC WORK:  Previous:  Full bore off-the-frame restoration sandblasted to bare metal before bodywork and paint. 


Recent
: Touch-up paint nicks and scratches.  Stainless steel passenger grab rail.  New Continental whitewall spare  tire.  New SIP gel battery to power the electric -tart motor.   
1975 Vespa Rally 200 (euro) @ $6,500



Ah yes, the venerable Rally 200 - heart be still!

Considered by most vintage scooter enthusiasts to be the last of a bygone era. 
 

Why you ask? . . . Because the Rally was the last of the all metal Vespas to come off the Piaggio factory assembly lines in Pontaderra, Italy. 

The Rally in its 180 and 200cc incarnations had a 12 year run before the P-Series took over incorporating the boxier lines and plastic body parts (headset and horncast) indicative of the "new" style that would usher in the 80's.

Although I love all Rally's, I am particularly fond of the Euro version never imported into the U.S.  Partly because of its rarity but more so because it's as the Italian designers intended.

These designers had to scramble to change elements of the U.S. versions: 
mandatory turn-signals, a smaller sealed beam headlight, a funky, clunky "tractor-style" tailight and decidedly cheesy reflectors on the front fender.

All these changes were required by the U.S. Department of Transportation's  motorcycle saferty laws of the 1970's and Piaggio couldn't export Vespas here unless they made a U.S. version.

By contrast, the Euro version had a much sleeker look because gangly turn signals and reflectors weren't yet required by European law.  It was also was equipped with a much larger (non-sealed beam) headlight and a sportier "flush-mount" tailight

The Euro look was definitely preferred by owners in the U.S. So much so that it's hard to find a U.S. version where its owner did not remove the turn-signals, reflectors and stalk tailight in favor of achieving sleekness!

STAY TUNED:  picture gallery coming soon / picture gallery coming soon / picture gallery coming soon / picture gallery coming soon


Back to our gal . . . she was imported from Italy about 15 years ago by a local San Francisco scooter shop and has remained in the Bay Area ever since. 

She's sporting a new coat of paint in her original Italian "Rosso Canyon" paint code.  I'm in love with the color because of its unique funky coolness.  It's hard to describe and looks different depending on light and shadow - It's part orange, part brown, part caramel and part fabulous!




MECHANICAL WORK:
Older engine rebuild & mechanical restoration.  Gas tank clean.  Carburetor rebuild.


COSMETIC WORK:  new paint job
1979 Lambretta Jet 200 Performer @ coming soon



Originality Rocks! . . . and so does this U.S. spec Lambretta Jet 200 on it's way to the Pazzo garage.

STAY TUNED:  picture gallery coming soon / picture gallery coming soon / picture gallery coming soon / picture gallery coming soon


More details when I get the time to play on the website.



MECHANICAL WORK:
 More to come.

COSMETIC WORK:  More to come
1979 Vespa P200 @ coming soon

 

Wait until you see "Lil Pepe!" in blazing Dia De Los Meurtos Mexican Technicolor!

I love "art scoots," I love original patina and I love P-series Vespas.  And yes my friends, Lil Pepe has all three in spades!

STAY TUNED:  picture gallery coming soon / picture gallery coming soon / picture gallery coming soon / picture gallery coming soon

More to come on this Tequila fueled love machine with more personality than there are beans in a burrito.


MECHANICAL WORK: Older engine rebuild & mechanical restoration. 

COSMETIC WORK:  Custom artwork, elbow grease and a good ol' Penetrol rubdown.

2007 Vespa PX200 (euro) @ $4,800



Here's something truly exciting, even to a jaded vintage scooter geek like me!

Why is that, you ask?  Well, I'll tell you why mon frere and soeur: 
  • It's the last PX series to roll off the Italian assmebly lines before everything went completely 4-stroke-twist-n-go-plastique.
  • It was NEVER imported into the U.S. (I won't tell if you don't) . . . and . . . wait for it . . .
  • It's a PX200!  The last evolution of Vespa's most powerful 200cc engine . . . Yes ! ! !
Meet the modern incarnation of the classic P-series - technologically updated for a new millennium.  You have to take the "Hot Tub Time Machine" back to 1981 to buy the last P-series 200cc scooter that Piaggio sent to the U.S. shores.  

STAY TUNED:  picture gallery coming soon / picture gallery coming soon / picture gallery coming soon / picture gallery coming soon

Our gal was manufactured in Italy sometime between 2004-2007 (exact serial number guides aren't published) before production for the PX200 ceased forever - and I do mean forever.

These final models had certain visible design features that are telltale of this last production run:  redesigned instrumentation and speedo, steering column ignition key, clear turn signal lenses with colored bulbs, halogen headlamp, old-school two tone Piaggio badging on horncast.  

You also see the addition of elegant and subtle chromed accents on the mudguard trim, hand grip ends and the bezels of the turn signal and tail light.


The PX200 combines the design silhouette of its original 1970's all-metal monocoque frame with all the modern technology that Piaggio was able to cram in before focusing all their attention on the new generation of "modern" scoots.

This end of an era was marked in 1996 when Vespa celebrated its 50th Anniversary with the introduction of the Vespa ET4 - a fully automatic transmission - 4-stroke - plastic bodied scooter.


No, Im not a hater - I just love classic - and this represents last gasp of air that these Italian maidens were able to make  before their time simply ran out.  Romantic, yes . . . but sadly true.

So here's the nitty griitty:  

1.  She has less than 100 original kilometers on the euro speedo (that's about 60 original miles! if your calculator's not handy) 

2.  Disc brake on the front fork (you can stop on a dime and keep the change!)

3.  Electric start (but you can still kick-start if you're an "OG Playa")

4.  More chrome than a rapper's Escalade (not even close, just like using the analogy)

5.  The paint is pristine (factory shipping stickers still on the body just like the sales tag on a gangbanger's baseball cap - yo dog, this place is lousy with urban analogies) 

6.  She's street legal, titled and registered in Cali (worth the price of admission - not an easy task in the current climate friendly environment if you know what I mean - and I'm sure you do)



MECHANICAL WORK: none - she's brand new and still being broken in!

COSMETIC WORK:  none, damn it - I said she's brand new.  I lied - I replaced the original factory "grandma" seat with an Ancillotti racing seat cause its cool and sleek.
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